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borrowing is something they are not able to do. someone who is getting a bachelor of science in nursing can afford to take on more debt than someone getting a degree in religious studies or a low income field. it does not mean you should abandon the degree. it means you should pay attention to the debt, because you may abandon the dream later. >> not all degrees are worth as much is something those of us who love liberal arts in the united states have a hard time coming to grips with. >> or journalism. >> is -- it obviously makes people uncomfortable that the situation is further curtailed by the family were born into. if you are a wonderful high school student, you have to think more about your major and your college than a student born into a wealthy family. how do you balance that with the reality of this crisis. >> one of the things we do at the national consumer law center is direct representation of low-income borrowers as well as speak to thousands of borrowers throughout the country. we do see the effect of this threw out the country. many students do not graduate. there is default.
cuts should be extended and for whom. taxation is not an economic science. it definitely -- if you gather 10 people in a room, you're going to get 10 different opinions and the views on taxing -- on the merits and philosophy of taxing individual asks the rich will vary. but, you know, this sort of immediate problem is not necessarily the larger philosophical question. it really is the more practical question of what is our tax system going to look like. host: and we've got this lead editorial from this morning's "wall street journal." real housewife offense the beltway. they write -- host: back to the phones. don in oklahoma city on our line for democrats. go ahead, don. caller: good morning. i have a couple of quick comments i would like to make. the first is that i find it ironic for so many years in recent history republicans have claimed to own patriotism yet they don't seem to want to vacate their fair share. host: joseph rosenberg. guest: you know, i mean, i'm not sure, you know, i'm not sure this is about pay. -- patriotism or anything like that. you know, the question of wh
at a letter sense out today by committee of science, space and technology, they are talking about a man in department of energy, running the loan gar abty program who was using private e-mail accounts and office of science and technology, technology officer there conducting business with a private e-mail account, how widespread do you believe this is? >> you have to say how many places is this the being used. and there is no doubt that people are trying to use it to avoid compliance with the freedom of information act. that is absolutely unacceptable. we have to find out how widespreaddis it. how many accounts are being used. different accounts traps a number -- perhaps a number of accounts by the same person, we have to assure this is not being used to avoid compliance with the law, transparency is for important not only to us but to american citizens this is not done, that is something we're not going to let go of until we get to the bottom of it. tom. i hope not, people said why are people not held accountable for their actions? are -- forgive me, i do not know the procedure or theel
foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> warner: five days and counting with plenty of tit-for- tat charges, but no agreement in sight. that, in short, summed up the state of affairs in washington today as the fiscal cliff deadline loomed, january first. it would mean more than $600 billion in across-the-board tax increases and automatic spending cuts. >> come the first of this year, americans will have less income than they have today. if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed. >> warner: this morning, the senate's democratic majority leader, harry reid, was blunt about chances for a deal. and he blamed house speaker john boehner. just before christmas, boehner floated his so-called "plan b"-- letting taxes rise on millionaires. but faced with opp
with doctorates in science, technology, engineering and math. two outgoing republican senators introducing legislation granting residence to those bought in the country illegally. though call it the achieve act, similar to the d.r.e.a.m. act. i spoke to one. bill's cosponsors, senator kay bailey hutchison. welcome to you here. how is your legislation different than the d.r.e.a.m. act? >> our legislation gives legal status to the young people in conundrum. they have grown up here. this is the country they know yet they are illegal because their parents brought them here before they were 14 years old. but we don't go into a citizenship track. we allow them to get in line behind the people who have been lawful and waited in line. so we don't give them a preference in line but we do give them a legal status and we don't prohibit them from getting in line if they choose to go the citizenship route. gerri: senator, what do you have to have to be able to be part of the program as you're defining it? >> you have to be under 14 when you came here and you have to be under 28 now. you can serve four
, there will be a new science of politics. the science of politics based on what all human beings have in common, acknowledged supplied by the senses. because people do not agree about religious truths, and because they fight over their disagreements, social tranquility is served by regarding religion as voluntary matter for private judgment. not state-supported and state enforced. in the interest of social peace, the higher aspirations of the ancient political philosophers were pushed to the margins of modern politics. those aspirations were considered, at best, unrealistic. at worst, downright dangerous. henceforth, politics would not be a sphere in which human nature is perfected. political project would not include appointing people towards their highest potentials. instead, a modern politics would be based on the assumption that people will express and will act upon the strong impulses of their flawed nature's. the ancients had asked, what is the highest of which mankind is capable? how can we pursue this in politics? hobbes asked, what is the worst that can happen in politics? and how can
there are social sciences out there and scientists who say this is true. now, increasingly, these educational benefits, which, you know, make only marginal improvements to education access, they are disputed. you know, it is increasingly disputed that their are any educational benefits. but i think it is also important for the court to bear in mind, and i think the court's jurisprudence is moving this way. even if there are some educational benefits, they have to be weighed against the cost that are inherent in engaging in this discrimination. something is compelling. and you have to consider the inherent liabilities and racial discrimination that involves as well. well, what are some of the costs of racial discrimination? well, i should know this by heart, but i do not. i post on comment sections on websites often. here it is. the cost of racial discrimination in admissions. it is personally unfair. it passes over better qualified students. disturbing legal and moral precedent and allowing racial discrimination. it creates resentment. it stigmatizes the so-called beneficiaries in the eyes of
quickly. >> the process of threat assessment is, is more of an art than a science. oftentimes you're dealing, uh, with potential enemies whose thinking is obscure or whose inner thoughts are unavailable to you and you have to read the tea leaves in trying to divine what their actions might be. >> people want to make a choice, they want to say let's focus on the current problem, less on the future. so other people say let's focus on the future and not so much on the current problem and unfortunately we don't have that option, that's just not with the role the united states plays today. >> ultimately defending the country with less money will mean rethinking what defense really is. >> the old-fashioned establishment of national security still thinks that the world is all about nation-state conflicts. so climate change doesn't rank high, energy scarcity doesn't rank high, resource generally, global health issues. even financial management after 2008 still ranks far below the sort of old-fashioned, you know, country-versus-country conflict issues. that's changing, but it's changing sl
card companies do. this isn't rocket science. when the red flag goes up, don't pay until you verify. if they do that, we will save tens of billions of dollars and put more money back into medicare which will make it more solvent. gerri: well, you know, goodness sakes. you're suggesting we adopt private sector ideas to a public sector system? senator, thanks for coming on tonight. a pleasure to talk to you. got to come back soon. appreciate your time. >> thanks so much, enjoyed being on. gerri: thank you. coming up, we go to the l.a. auto show and we'll tell you the hottest trend in all things cars. we look ahead to 2013. what could be the next big stress to the financial system. why nobody is talking about it, we will next. dry mouth may start off as an irritant. it'll cause cavities, bad breath. but if you're not drinking it, it's going to get dry again. i recommend biotene. all the biotene products like the oral rinse...the sprays have enzymes in them. the whole formulation just works very well. it leaves the mouth feeling fresh. if i'm happy with the results and my patients are h
the credit card companies do. this isn't rocket science. when the red flag goes up, don't pay until you verify. we will save tens of billions of dollars and put more money back and medicare, which will make it more solvent. gerri: goodness sakes, you are suggesting we adopt private sector ideas to the public sector system? ththank you for coming on, a pleasure to talk to you. you have got to come back soon. >> thank you so much, enjoyed beg on. gerri: thank you. coming up and we go to the l.a. auto show and show you the hottest trends of all things cars. and looking ahead to 2013 at the next threat to the financial system. when nobody is talking about it. we will next. gerri: it is called the shadowdo banking system, hedge fund, money market fund, any lender typically not aw st bank and bld by many for the global financial crisis. they're bigger than ever at $67 trillion in termshe of asses according to an report from the financial stabilityrd board. i asked editor-in-chief ofnanc american banker about the risks it poses to the total financial system. >> essays on the financial to syste
and financing, if you look at the statistics are round or they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading, you can see where the problem is. today, they were in the number 27, 28, and so on. productivity generally is the x factor that accommodates for 60% of why one country grows and another does not. generally, it includes things like political dynamic, so we know what is happening there. that is not my prediction. look at this framework, capital, labor, productivity. you will see why i am incredibly bullish. in terms of capital, these economies by a large did not have the debt burden that other countries are facing right now. why is that important? these countries are not suffering from a deal leveraging problem. 60%-70% is under the age of 25. in you got there, over 50% is under the age of 15. we can talk about that once i sit down. once again, a really interesting story. they were talking about 30% increases over goods and services. in virtually all statistics, things like political improvements and freedoms, this is really essential. countries like rwanda have been ranke
care about the science and less about the politics. >> do the -- does the specter of any type of price controls for pharmaceuticals, is that on the horizon for this country, or are we -- will we still lead the world in innovation because we won't -- we're not stupid enough to try to figure prices there? >> that's a leading question. >> it is. >> but the one major explicit price control mechanism in obama care is called an ipad board. and i can't -- i cannot remember this early hour what that stands for. but that one is -- if there's going to be anything that's overturned, it will be the ipad board. neither democrats nor republicans like it. it's -- the board, the -- >> independent payment -- >> thank you. the death panel so to speak. but it looks like it's -- >> you agree with me that the innovation has been stifled by not being able to charge what it takes to develop the drug, right? >> well, innovation is a funny thing. it's not necessarily dollar to dollar. i mean, sometimes you can just drop a soda in a -- you know, a petri dish and get penicillin like fleming did. >> that's not th
chair, had a governmental studies program, got his ba in political science from university of florida in this animated phd from the university of michigan. so he speaks for the heartland of our great country. >> any cd automobile industry. [laughter] >> and was opposed by stopping production of the units sold. the electors are solid in all and is on every show known to humankind. they've often competed for the most quotations in any given year than all of our media. norm is a resident scholar at the representative for public policy research. the election analyst for cbs and has written for every publication on the face of the earth dirty and tom both have been on the news hour with jim lehrer, "nightline," charlie rose. he has another heartland are, ba university of minnesota phd from the university of michigan, which is where you guys met. i just have to say that one of the reasons why i think that tom and norm for so much attention is because they have been spending their entire lives being so moderate and reasonable that when they get mad, they really must be something wrong. so wh
to understand there is no established science right now to determine whether or not a gene will predispose someone to violent behavior. i mean that's the first thing. this is a very complicated situation. people have genes. they don't always predispose or actually turn into a specific problem. and in this case if someone were to be found to have a gene, and this is a needle in a haystack, it might give some clues as to whether or not someone might or, other people might be predisposed to this kind of crime. heather: this would be a first of a kind study or a first of a kind research to >> again, there have been studies that have been done on violent offenders, and previously and we have gotten some body of evidence that helped us to determine whether this is a problem. where it is more established, where we're doing genetic testing where it is incredibly value in determining predisposing conditions such as taysak's disease or whether someone ends up with sickle cell anemia. whether someone is predisposed to alzheimer's or cancer it gets controversial and this particular probably the most c
science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. stuart: we are getting some reports of quote optimism and significant progress in the fiscal cliff talks. let's bring in peter barnes who is close to these talks. what do you make of it, optimism? you're looking away from me. look me in the eyes there. [laughter] peter: getting all the e-mails all of a sudden now. we have got all this optimism, all this significant progress, progress aides close to the talks between vice president biden and republican leader mitch mcconnell say there is significant progress. some senior republican aide says progress but not done. republican senators express optimism. a senate democratic leader harry reid on his way into the building expressed optimism. stuart: but peter it is only optimism for this super narrow, narrow deal where there's simply a number thrown out there, 400,000 or 500,000 or 250,000 and above that level you pay more tax, below it you don't. that's all it is, isn't it? that's all. peter: yeah, so far. i think that part of the -- part of the head winds, part of the problems with this deal
the aging population. also in terms of quality. they measure the performance in mathematics, science, and reading and rank countries every three years. and then productivity. productivity is supposed to account for about 60% of white one country grows and another does not. how efficient we are in using capital labor and rule of law, how open the business environment is. we know what is happening there. look at the frame work and applied it to the emerging markets. i am incredibly bullish for 2013 and the years ahead. places like africa -- compared to over 100% in places like greece and italy. these countries are not suffering from the leveraging problem. 60% of the emerging world is under the age of 25. over the to% in places like uganda. there are issues with youth employment. we are talking about 30% increases. opportunity for economic growth. things like political improvement in terms of democracy and freedoms. i have to have this debate with you, bill. countries like rwanda have been ranked number 1 by the world bank as the most improved. then the closed by telling you this. 90%
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> welcome back to "squawk box." shares of marvell technology falling this morning. company says they're going to seek to overturn a jury's patent infringement finding. yesterday a federal jury found marvell infringed two patents held by carnegie mellon. the chipmaker has been ordered to pay $1.2 billion in damages. another big payday maybe for -- >> lawyers. >> now to the winter storm slamming the east coast. the weather channel's reynolds wolf joins us now with more. is this one named, reynolds? >> this one is indeed named. this one is given the name euclid. go figure. i say that spells trouble. it's certainly going to spell trouble for people trying to travel out of new york. you look at this color code behind us, where you happen to see the orange and the yellow. just like on a traffic light you're going to have a little bit of caution there. but ground travel at least air travel may come to a screeching halt in places like boston, portland, maine, mind you and even i
.s. department of agriculture, social science analyst. thank you for being with us. >> thank you for having us. >> tomorrow, we will continue looking at fiscal cliff negotiations and how americans will be affected if the deadline passes. our guest will be joseph rosenberg, followed by a look by presidential campaigning and the influence of the electoral college. then a discussion on hurricane sandy relief funding. we will be joined by dan freed iedman. all that beginning at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c-span. ♪ >> if we turn away from the needs of others, we align ourselves with those forces which are bringing about this suffering. >> the white house is a bully pulpit and you ought to take advantage of it. >> obesity is nothing short of a public health conference. >> i think i had little antennas go up that told me when somebody had there an agenda. >> it would be a shame to waste it. >> i think they serve as a window on the past to what was going on with american women. >> she becomes the chief confidante, really any way the only one in the world he could trust. >> they were writers, journali
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)